Posts in Uncategorized

What I Learned During my Time as an Intern at Coastkeeper

February 20th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “What I Learned During my Time as an Intern at Coastkeeper”

By Hannah Del Barto

 

When I first landed my internship for the restoration program at Coastkeeper, my intention was to get lots of hands-on experience – helping at the Coastkeeper garden, building oyster beds, and doing beach clean ups.

Unfortunately, most of my internship was done remotely due to COVID-19. Instead, I spent most of my time attending meetings, watching live streams and webinars, and doing research. I still learned a lot as I:

Assisted with researching potential grant opportunities and oyster shell recycling legislation around the United States to further expand Coastkeeper’s oyster restoration projects
Researched ocean acidification
Created a flyer and edited a blog for our living shorelines project
Attended a virtual MPA Watch training
Researched laws and bills regarding beachfront property issues in Newport Beach

Learning to Fight Poseidon

Coastkeeper has been fighting against Poseidon’s Huntington Beach desalination plant proposal for years and the team taught me that the plant would have detrimental effects on our climate, economy and oceans. 

I’ve learned that our current water recycling system in Orange County produces twice as much water as Poseidon’s proposed plant for a fraction of the cost. Not only would the plant produce less water, but it would make water very expensive for consumers and would be the most energy intensive way to produce fresh water. The most damaging effect is that the pipes for the plant would suck up tons of marine life that play an important role in the ecosystem. 

Listening to the countless community members speak up about their opposing views towards the desalination plant really moved me. The fact that all of these people took time out of their day to speak out against something that they passionately believe is wrong, in hopes to make change, is quite inspiring. 

My take-away from this is that there is a great power in the voice of people who come together. I now understand that I have a say in the environmental decisions that my city makes. 

Learning in the Field

Although I was a little bummed that I couldn’t do all the hands-on work that I initially expected to be a part of the majority of my internship, I was able to get in-person field work approved just in time to participate in Coastkeeper’s annual eelgrass surveys! 

During this time, I worked as a boat hand – assisting with cleaning supplies, handing the divers their gear when they were in the water, collecting bags of eelgrass into buckets, taking photos, and looking out for incoming boats, kayakers, paddleboarders, etc. – all while the divers were under water. 

Reading a report on the results of a scientific experiment is one thing, but actually watching the data being taken and helping the scientists with whatever they needed was a super cool experience. Now I can say that I understand how a marine restoration project goes down! 

A Lifelong Inspiration for Conservation

The main highlight of my internship has been learning about the roles that oysters and eelgrass play in the ecosystem, our water quality, and shoreline stability. It is a subject that I have never really considered and did not have any prior knowledge about.

I have discovered a secret passion for restoration, conservation, and volunteer work thanks to Coastkeeper.

Although this internship was for marine restoration and my field of study is public health, I have learned that the two subjects are directly related. After exploring how the conditions of our environment affects the health of humans, I realized that I want to go back to school to pursue a Masters of Environmental Health at San Diego State University. 

This internship prepared me for a better career in the future because it opened up my eyes to so many possibilities and opportunities to better the environment, which has always been a priority and life-long goal of mine.

The post What I Learned During my Time as an Intern at Coastkeeper appeared first on Orange County Coastkeeper.

https://www.coastkeeper.org/what-i-learned-during-my-time-as-an-intern-at-coastkeeper/

California State University, Long Beach tags a record of 53 great white sharks off the California Coast

February 10th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “California State University, Long Beach tags a record of 53 great white sharks off the California Coast”

LONG BEACH一In 2020 the California State University, Long Beach Shark Lab tagged a record number of 53 great white sharks off the coast of Southern California.
The lab worked closely with lifeguards up and down the coast to tag the sharks and record information they are hoping will assist in predicting the shark’s behaviors later down the line.
Shark Lab Director Dr. Chris Lowe and his team have been observing the juveniles in the Northeast Pacific great white shark population, which encompasses as far north as Alaska and as far south as Mexico, who utilize the Southern California coast as a nursery.
Great white sharks are born off the California coast and average between 4 to 5 feet in length, the sharks are considered adults when the males reach 11 to 12 feet in length and the females reach about 12 feet, which can take over a decade.
These juveniles spend their time hanging out around the Southern California and Mexico shoreline right past the surf break.
Lowe’s hypothesis is that the sharks feel safe in the shallows and have an abundant food source from the rays that hang off the coast.
With the sharks right off the surf break, it often puts them closer to people, which can be dangerous for both.
“We now work with all the lifeguards in California because when white sharks show up at their beach, they are responsible for keeping the public safe… So, we give them information [and] they work with us,” said Lowe.
One of the new ways Lowe and his team tag sharks in conjunction with lifeguards is by using jet skis. A grad student climbs on the back of a lifeguard jet ski, rides up next to the shark, and darts them in the back with the transmitter.
Lowe’s team will use drones or helicopters to spot the shark and determine coordinates as well as size, they also have an underwater camera they use to determine gender and other visual markers on the shark.
“We have a variety of techniques depending on the beach, depending on what the lifeguards have regarding boats or jet skis,” said Lowe. “You know we are working along surf-ridden beaches we have to be careful of people, and it is a dangerous place to be operating that’s why it is so important that we work closely with the lifeguards.”
Lowe is hoping that by learning more about the great white shark population scientists will be able to predict their behavior in the future and create a safer environment on the beaches for sharks and for people.
Lowe said it takes consecutive years of research to determine which beaches and conditions appeal to the sharks to make them hang out on certain parts of the coast.
“Normally shark season starts in April and goes to November, climate change has definitely affected that pattern,” said Lowe. “We see more sharks sticking around during winter because for the last eight years or so our winters have been milder.”
The team also spends a great deal of time educating the public about marine life and is hoping to reopen their Shark Shacks, informational booths set up by students, once COVID restrictions lift over the summer. To learn more, see the CSULB Shark Lab website: https://www.csulb.edu/shark-lab.

https://www.fishrapnews.com/features/california-state-university-long-beach-tags-a-record-of-53-great-white-sharks-off-the-california-coast/

The Most Trash our Education Coordinator has ever seen…

February 9th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “The Most Trash our Education Coordinator has ever seen…”

By Cristina Robinson

As the Education Coordinator at OC Coastkeeper, I have learned so much about how to be a better steward of my local watershed and environment, and love practicing what we preach to our students.

Before COVID, our education staff (myself & Dyana Peña) would be busy throughout the school year taking students on field trips to wonderful habitats and places throughout our various watersheds in Orange County. As much as I enjoyed our field trips, I couldn’t help but notice all the litter at every location.

I’m also a Tidepool Educator for Laguna Ocean Foundation and am constantly seeing trash in and around our tidepools that are in designated Marine Protected Areas. Though I didn’t want to be more active on social media, I decided to use my platform to educate others regarding plastic pollution, plastic alternatives, and zero waste options.

In the fall of 2019, I created the website www.plasticmenot.com to showcase all these resources, as well as an Instagram account to educate my followers on a more frequent basis.

In mid-October of 2020, my fellow litter-picking California State University, Long Beach marine biology alumni buddy, Janine Rodriguez, and I teamed up to start a trash project where we created stickers encouraging people to protect our planet from pollution and to include friends and family in cleanups.

We sell each sticker for $1 and pick up one pound of trash for every sticker sold, and then post a dedicated cleanup to the buyer on our respective social media accounts. Thus far, we have 903 pounds of trash to remove and have already removed 465 pounds! Learn how to order our stickers by checking out my Instagram or Janine’s @_trashygurl account.

Since we launched this project, I’ve been trying to do cleanups every weekend or so to chip away at our 903 pounds we have committed to remove with the support we received.

A Trashy Adventure at the Santa Ana River Mouth

During the last weekend of January, I had planned my weekly cleanup to be at the beach since I knew we would have intensified trash along our coast from the big rainstorm we had a couple of days prior. However, I was not expecting to witness or remove the amount of trash I found on Jan. 30 and Jan. 31, 2021.

On Saturday, Jan. 30, my friend Brittney, her two children, and her sister joined me for a beach cleanup as they had been the last few weekends. I had them meet me in the neighborhood across the street from the Frog House (for free parking), as I knew there would be a lot of trash to be found since we were at the end of the Santa Ana River Mouth (SARM).

This is where the Santa Ana River Watershed drains. It is this the largest watershed in Orange County and it travels across San Bernardino, Riverside, and Orange County.

We walked over to the Newport City side of the beach and picked up almost 50 pounds of trash within 30 minutes, just from what was around the jetties. While we were picking up trash in the rocks, we saw across from us what looked like a trash island and were horrified!

We then quickly weighed our first trash haul, emptied our bucket and bags of trash by compiling everything into a convenient tub we found, left this at my car, then walked over the Pacific Coast Highway bridge where we discovered a trash goldmine. The trash island was more of a trash peninsula, and quite frankly brought me to tears.

I have never seen so much trash congregated in one area before – ever. There were huge furniture items, shoes galore, so many facemasks, tons of food and beverage containers, toys, endless pieces of Styrofoam and plastic, and so much more. I posted videos on my social media story asking for help to join me in removing more the next day.

 

We refilled our bucket and bags as much as we could and made a pile of shoes we hoped to return to the next day. With no trash cans to be seen in near sight and my car on the other side of the river mouth, we luckily found a nearby abandoned shopping cart to push all the trash back to my car. After weighing all the trash hauls from Saturday, we were amazed that the five of us had removed 127.65 pounds of trash!

On Jan. 31, I came back to the SARM, but this time I parked my car in the Huntington State Beach parking lot since it was closer to the trash peninsula. My call for help was heard and some wonderful friends joined me in removing even more trash.

After a quick surf session and grabbing a balloon and some plastic pieces on the way to my car, Brittney and her kids joined me again in picking up trash starting in the parking lot. Dyana and her boyfriend, Chris, then joined us and once all our bags and buckets were full, we consolidated the trash and left it at my car to weigh later.

We then made our way to the trash peninsula where my friends Kaysha and Kelsey had started cleaning up the debris. They had been filling up their buckets, walking them to the nearest trash can (which wasn’t that near), and returning to do it all over again.

On this day, we tackled some huge heavy items (including the shoe pile from Saturday). Thanks to Dyana’s quick thinking, we got maintenance to help haul the heavy trash items.

 

Dyana’s sister and parents had also removed 30 pounds of trash to help us on the Talbert channel side of Huntington State Beach. Kaysha and Kelsey kept track of their weight of trash removed for the day, so that night we compiled our data (I had to triple check mine because I was in disbelief), but altogether we removed 397.69 pounds of trash! My personal weight of trash picked up for the entire weekend was 377.47 pounds.

I am simultaneously so proud of these efforts, but so sad that this much trash was there to begin with, and that still so much trash remains.

How You Can Help Keep our Coast Classy, not TrashyPlease use this as a call to action to help in preventing this trash from draining to our coast by not littering, reducing your plastic and Styrofoam use, and doing neighborhood cleanups whenever you can.

At OC Coastkeeper, we are currently providing ‘Cleanup Kits’ that include a trash bag with two sets of gloves per household (adult & children sizes) and have these available outside our office door every Wednesday from noon to 2 p.m. We would also like to distribute these cleanup kits throughout Orange County, so please let us know where they are needed.

We are organizing Emergency Cleanups in areas with extreme litter accumulation before and after rain events. If you are experienced in cleanups and interested in joining our Emergency Cleanup Volunteer List, please fill out our quick Google Form. Feel free to let us know of any areas that need an emergency cleanup near you!

 

My friends that joined Sunday’s cleanup also keep track of all the trash they remove for their own amazing cleanup efforts. You can check out Kaysha Kenney’s Instagram and Kelsey Nannini’s Instagram to follow along with their conservation efforts.

The post The Most Trash our Education Coordinator has ever seen… appeared first on Orange County Coastkeeper.

https://www.coastkeeper.org/the-most-trash-our-education-coordinator-has-ever-seen/

 

San Diego Fish Report

February 5th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “San Diego Fish Report”

SAN DIEGO — The past couple of weeks have witnessed some climate structures roll through Southern California that have brought high seas, strong airs, rain, and storm. The gusts were strong enough during one recent tornado to have Gale Warnings posted in Southern California. The good story for anglers during the past couple of weeks has been that the days of good condition between brave methods have equipped some eras of good fishing.

The best overall angling “ve been here for” boats traveling down the coast of Mexico on 1.5 -day trips to fish the seas off Punta Colnett. The fishing off of Punta Colnett has been very good during this winter season and continues to produce quality mixed bag, bottom fishing for wines, rockfish, and lingcod. There has also been a chance of locating some skin-deep fishing fervor from yellowtail and bonito. The most recent fish counts from the Punta Colnett area start with Pacific Queen out of Fisherman’s Landing that had 25 anglers on a 1.5 -day trip caught 4 yellowtail, 125 cherry-reds, 105 rockfish, 9 lingcod, and 3 sheephead.

H& M Landing had Relentless fishing a 1.5 period to Punta Colnett and they returned home with 19 anglers catching 179 rockfish and 11 lingcod. Most of the yellowtail being caught off Punta Colnett ought to have quality-sized fish that are in the 15 to 25 -pound class. Punta Colnett yellowtail often burns best from stopping on meter marks and sonar labels and fishing with yo-yo iron or with sardines that are fished on dropper loop-the-loop rigs.

The past weekend drew good weather and some private boaters out to sample the fishing around Los Coronado Islands. There were a couple of reports about the surface fishing activity with bonito reported to be biting around North Island. The remaining reports were of good bottom fishing for blood-reds and rockfish together with an periodic bonus lingcod. A Skipper who was catching bonito at North Island reported that there were 2-pound bonito piercing off the forecast side of North Island and that there were larger bonito that went to 7 pounds piercing along the lee side of North Island.

Sardines, small-minded chrome jigs, and trolled Rapalas would be good hand-pickeds for bonito. Productive bottom fishing areas around Los Coronado Islands ought to have the hard underside to the north and the northwest of North Island in 35 to 50 fathoms as well as hard tush recognises to the east and northeast of North Island in 20 to 25 sees. The rockpile and the crest provinces below and outside of South Island have also been fertile for bottom fishing in the 25 to 40 -fathom depths.

An ongoing reminder to anglers is that the annual 2-month rockfish/ groundfish ending on the United Regime side of the Mexico border went into effect on Jan. 1. This means that those wishing to fish for the rockfish and groundfish species covered by the closure will need to travel into Mexico’s oceans if they want to fish for these genus during the course of its 2-month shutdown period. The close in Southern California waters will come to an end on March 1.

With the annual 2-month rockfish and groundfish closure in effect, Skippers fishing along the San Diego County coast have been focusing their efforts on genus that are still open to fishing such as calico bass, sand bass, sculpin, halibut, and yellowtail. The bass and sculpin fishing have both been good and there has also been periodic yellowtail or lily-white seabass chewing to go with a few cases halibut.

The yellowtail and white-hot seabass fishing has been scratchy but the past weekend of good brave did watch some yellowtail pinpointed by see rhythm commemorates and distinguishes of undermining fish. There was also a chance at conclusion a white seabass piercing in the same areas where a yellowtail was being spotted. Spots, where yellow-tail activity was reported, were below and outside of the Crystal Pier at Pacific Beach as well as while fish outside of the upper death of La Jolla, Torrey Pines, and Corona Del Mar.

Locating areas of bait continues to be a good way to try and position yourself to be in the freedom blot at the right time should some yellowtail decide to show. Most of the yellowtail task has been is located within 18 to 35 penetrates. Surface iron works best when cast to fish that are experienced upon the surface and yo-yo iron works best when removing down to meter brands or sonar assessments. Sardines and mackerel can also be effective when gradual trolled, flylined, or fished depth on a dropper loop rig. The yellowtail felt along the coast has been quality-sized fish with most between 15 and 25 pounds. Good options for face cast-iron include Salas 7X beacons and Tady 45 ’s in blue-blooded and grey, plenty and sardine colors. Good options for yo-yo iron include Salas 6X and Salas 6X Jr. jigs in off-color and grey, clambered egg, and blue-blooded and chrome. See fi shrapnews.com for the remainder of this story.

Bob Vanian is the voice, novelist, and researcher of the San Diego-based internet fish report service announced 976 -Bite which can be found at www. 976 bite.com. Vanian also provides anglers with a personal fish report service over the telephone at( 619) 226 -8 218. He always welcomes your fish reports at that same phone number or at bob9 76 bite @aol. com.Bob Vanian’s9 76 -BITE FISH REPORTSwww. 976 BITE.COMF or Internet Reports Visit www. 976 bite.comFor Personal Reports Call( 619) 226 -8 218 Saltwater and FreshwaterMarine Art PrintsChuck Byron LithographsRetail and wholesale pricing.( Quantity deductions accessible) $20.00 plus $ 6.95 sending in the US. To situate an tell, contact us at: Fishoncontests @gmail. comor announce 619 -3 01.3193 Byron Productschuckbyron.com

https://www.fishrapnews.com/fishreports/san-diego-fish-report-2/

Bluefin tuna and swordfish biting as new year approaches

January 31st, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Bluefin tuna and swordfish biting as new year approaches”

SAN DIEGO–The end of 2020 has approached fast and bluefin tuna, yellowtail and swordfish have still been nip in local offshore waters.

The weekend of Dec. 19 realized three ships out looking for bluefin tuna following several days of bad weather. The good bulletin is that 12 to 35 -pound bluefin tuna, 15 to 25 -pound yellowtail, large bonito and an jumble of rockfish search for and burning at the Cortes Bank. Sardines were a good bait for the bluefin tuna that were biting over the weekend. If you are able to locate some of the larger sized bluefin that have gone to 200 -plus pounds in recent weeks, a kite fished frozen flying fish would be a good way to go. Look for rhythm markers, sonar crisscross, blots of interrupting fish and places of gust fish to situate bluefin tuna.

The other offshore fishing operations going on during this late part of the 2020 fishing season has been deep remove fishing for swordfish. The 9 Mile Bank remains a central orbit of undertaking, with the 178 Spot, the dropoff rack outside of Mission Bay and La Jolla, the La Jolla Canyon and the Carlsbad Canyon all being areas where barges have been spread out and getting periodic pierces. Best baits for the swordfish ought to have large-scale frozen squid, mackerel and bonito.

The fishing at Los Coronado Islands remains good for a mix of bonito, yellowtail, reds and assorted rockfish. Most of the yellowtail have been noted and caught by sportboats via situating the fisheries industry with searching sonar and it has been difficult for most private boaters to locate yellowtail with the use of a traditional up and down style fathometer. The best recent sportboat yellowtail weigh was when San Diego out of Seaforth Sportfishing fished a full day trip on Dec. 19, 2020 with 34 anglers who caught 23 yellowtail, 170 reds and 94 rockfish.

The yellowtail gnaw at Los Coronado Islands are currently in the 8 to 18 -pound range and have been biting best on yo-yo iron, dropper loop-the-loop fished sardines and flylined sardines.

Productive domains for bonito have been at North Island, the Middle Grounds and the lee side of South Island with the Pukey Point area of North Island being the most wonderful. The bonito have been biting on sardines, small chrome jigs and trolled Rapalas.

Fishing for rockfish around Los Coronado Islands has been very successful with the lower part of the 9 Mile Bank and the hard underside towards the east , northwest and north of North Island provide some of the best action for a quality mix of scarlets, salmon grouper and assorted rockfish.

The fishing along the San Diego County Coast remains mostly in a rockfish fish state with good numbers of reds and assorted rockfish sting but there have been periodic registers of yellowtail off La Jolla, Mission Bay and the Green Tank at Point Loma. There have also been some sand bass and calico bass grab off Imperial Beach, Point Loma and Mission Bay.

There have been periodic disturbances of beach bass biting at hard bottom areas off Imperial Beach as well as while net hard-boiled bottom blots to the southeast of the Whistler Buoy at Point Loma. Some calico bass have been biting for crafts fishing hard-boiled bottom areas off the Point Loma Lighthouse as well as while trawl the Jetty Kelp outside of Mission Bay.

An periodic halibut is being caught by ships floating the sandy freighter next to hard-bitten bottom areas off Imperial Beach. Occasional halibut are also being reported by boats fishing off South Carlsbad as well as at the sandy bottom next to the structure of the Yukon shipwreck and the sunken NEL Tower that are located outside of Mission Beach.

Hard bottom and organize spheres ought to have growing the good fishing for rockfish along the San Diego County coast and productive areas include the Imperial Beach Pipeline, the International Reef, the Point Loma Pipeline, the Green Tank, the 270, the upper extremity of La Jolla, Del Mar, Solana Beach, Leucadia, Carlsbad and Box Canyon.

If the climate and liquid cases remain stable the 2020 offshore fishing season looks a lot like it might just roll right into 2021 on New Years Day. It will be interesting to see what happens and how long it will take for someone to catch the first bluefin tuna or the first swordfish of 2021.

Bob Vanian is the voice, novelist and researcher of the San Diego-based internet fish report service called 976 -Bite which can be found at www. 976 bite.com. Vanian also provides anglers with a personal fish report service over the telephone at( 619) 226 -8 218. He ever welcomes your fish reports at that same phone number or at bob9 76 gnaw @aol. com.

https://www.fishrapnews.com/fishreports/bluefin-tuna-and-swordfish-biting-as-new-year-approaches/

2021 fishing season off to a fast start with bluefin tuna and yellowtail biting

January 30th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “2021 fishing season off to a fast start with bluefin tuna and yellowtail biting”

SAN DIEGO–The commencing from 2021 brought with it an opportunity for anglers to catch a wide variety of categories, with bluefin tuna and yellowtail being spotlights. Anglers had to travel a long way to get to bluefin tuna but the potential payoff was a chance at getting to do battle with 150 to 250 -plus pound bluefin tuna.

Some of the San Diego-based long-range boats were get into the large-hearted bluefin tuna while fishing an sphere to the southwest of San Quintin at about 165 miles 155 degrees from Point Loma. The High Spot area off Punta Colnett was another hotspot area accommodate very good fishing to start off the New Year with good numbers of vast yellowtail burning to go with lots of scarlets, rockfish and lingcod. Pacific Queen out of Fisherman’s Landing fished a 1.5 -day trip to the Punta Colnett area on Jan. 2 and met excellent fish with 34 anglers catching 90 yellowtail, 22 lingcod, 112 colours and 110 rockfish.

Fisherman’s Landing reports that the yellowtail aboard Pacific Queen were quality sized fish that were in the 15 -to-2 5-pound assortment. Yo-yo iron and dropper loop-the-loop fished sardines work well for the Punta Colnett yellowtail when stopped down to meter tags and sonar commemorates found in the region of the High Spot.

A reminder to anglers is that the annual two-month rockfish/ groundfish ending on the United Nation area of the Mexico border went into effect on Jan. 1. Those wishing to fish for the rockfish/ groundfish species covered by the closure need to travel into Mexican waters if they want to fish for these categories in the next two months. The closure in Southern California waters will come to an end on March 1.

With the closure, skippers fishing along the San Diego County coast have been focusing their efforts on calico bass, sand bass, sculpin, halibut and yellowtail. There has been some pretty good fishing for the calico bass, sand bass and sculpin and there have also been some tumults of yellowtail task to go with an periodic halibut.

The yellowtail stinging along the San Diego County coast has drawn a lot of attention but the yellowtail fishing has been hit or miss from day to day. Yellowtail have been find spread out between the Green Tank area at Point Loma and the upper outcome of La Jolla. Hot blots within that zone have been off the Green Tank at Point Loma, Sunset Cliffs, the Jetty Kelp off Mission Bay, the Yukon Shipwreck outside of Mission Beach, the expanse outside of the Crystal Pier while fishing below and outside of the MLPA closure zone and while fishing outside of the upper objective of La Jolla.

Most of the yellowtail undertaking has been discovered while fish in 18 to 40 sees of irrigate and most of the morsels is just coming up stopping on meter traces, sonar differentiates or places of fish attain up on the surface labor bait. Surface iron works best when cast to fish that are up on the surface and yo-yo iron works best when plummeting down to meter marks or sonar markers. Sardines and mackerel can also be effective while sluggish trolled, flylined or fished deep with a dropper curve rigging. Good options for face cast-iron include Salas 7X flames and Tady 45 ’s in blue-blooded and lily-white, slew and sardine emblazons. Good selects for yo-yo iron include Salas 6X and Salas 6X Jr. jigs in off-color and lily-white, scrambled egg and off-color and chrome.

The morning hours ought to have the best for an opportunity at a yellowtail. The yellowtail received along the coast have been quality sized fish with the majority up in the 15 -to-2 5-pound class.

The remainder of the San Diego County coastal fish has been focused on sand bass, calico bass and sculpin with hard bottom and design spots causing most of the fish. A beneficial neighbourhood has been outside of the Imperial Beach Pier in 7 to 12 sees of liquid. Other fertile areas include the Imperial Beach Pipeline, hard foot areas outside of the Pipeline, the hard posterior to the northwest of Buoy# 3 at Point Loma, the Jetty Kelp outside of Mission Bay, the upper discontinue of La Jolla, the Anderson and Buccaneer Pipelines, the artificial ridges outside of Oceanside Harbor and Box Canyon.

The halibut fishing along the San Diego County coast has been scratchy but there have been a few halibut biting. Try blots where you can fish sandy bottom next to structure and sandy underside contiguou to hard bottom. Productive halibut recognizes ought to have outside of the Imperial Beach Pier, the sandy fanny next to the Yukon Shipwreck, the sandy posterior next to the sunken NEL Tower and outside of South Ponto Beach at South Carlsbad.

Keep on fishing and I hope to see you out on the water sometime soon!

Bob Vanian is the voice, scribe and researcher of the San Diego-based internet fish report service announced 976 -Bite which can be found at www. 976 bite.com. Vanian also provides anglers with a personal fish report service over the telephone at( 619) 226 -8 218. He always welcomes your fish reports at that same telephone number or at bob9 76 bite @aol. com.

https://www.fishrapnews.com/fishreports/2021-fishing-season-off-to-a-fast-start-with-bluefin-tuna-and-yellowtail-biting/

Wintertime fishing remains good

January 29th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Wintertime fishing remains good”

SAN DIEGO–The cold water winter angling season has finally set in but that does not mean the fishing has been slow. The best overall net has been for boats traveling down the Mexican coast on 1.5 and 1.75 day trips to fish the liquids off Punta Colnett. The trawl off Punta Colnett has been making very good mixed bag bottom fishing for red-faceds, rockfish and lingcod and has also been catering a chance at observe some surface fishing enjoyable from yellowtail and bonito.

A recent fish 1.5 day trip aboard Pacific Queen out of Fisherman’s Landing to Punta Colnett had 33 anglers catch 141 rockfish, 114 red-faceds, 13 lingcod and 19 yellowtail. H& M Landing had Ocean Odyssey fishing a 1.75 day trip with 28 anglers catch 250 rockfish, 150 blood-reds, 18 bonito and 2 yellowtail.

Most of the yellowtail get caught off Punta Colnett ought to have aspect sized fish that exist in the 15 -to-2 5-pound class. Punta Colnett yellowtail often bite best from stopping on rhythm scores and sonar observes and fishing with yo-yo iron or with sardines that are fished on dropper loop-the-loop rigs.

In more neighbourhood offshore liquids, there has not been much recent bulletin on penetrating plummet fishing for swordfish but during the first week or so of the new time there was a bit of deep cease swordfish fishing activity reported by crafts fishing between the 178 Spot and Oceanside as well as at the Avalon Bank and the 152 Spot off the Eastern end of Catalina.

Recent reports coming from Los Coronado Islands are of very good fishing for ruby-reds and rockfish. The last reports of surface fishing activity from Los Coronado Islands were from a week ago when there were good number of small bonito piercing around North Island.

The reports about good rockfish fishing around Los Coronado Islands have been coming from areas such as the lower end of the 9 Mile Bank while fishing on the Mexico side of the border as well as from hard underside areas to the north and the northwest of North Island in the 35 to 50 penetrate extents. Another fertile rockfish area has been at hard-handed bottom regions below and outside of South Island in 25 to 40 fathoms.

A reminder to anglers is that the annual two-month rockfish/ groundfish close on the United State feature of the Mexico border went into effect on January 1, 2021. Those wishing to fish for the rockfish/ groundfish species covered by the closure will need to travel into Mexican waters.

With the annual rockfish/ groundfish shutdown in effect in Southern California liquids until March 1, skippers fishing along the San Diego County coast have been focusing their efforts on calico bass, beach bass, sculpin, halibut and yellowtail. There has been pretty good to good fishing for the calico bass, beach bass and sculpin reported and there has also been periodic yellowtail and halibut activity.

The yellowtail fish has been scratchy but there have been a few institutions of yellowtail around that rarely show in an area ranging from Sunset Cliffs on up to the upper end of La Jolla. The yellows tend to show best during the morning hours and locating areas of bait has been a good way to try and position yourself to be in the right spot at the appropriate time if and when the yellows decide to show.

Most of the yellowtail act has been determined while fishing in the 18 to 35 penetrate depths. Surface iron works best when cast to yellowtail that are found up on the surface and yo-yo iron is most effective when plummeting down to meter crisscross or sonar observes. Sardines and mackerel can also be effective while sluggish trolled, flylined or fished deep on a dropper loop rig.

Good options for face cast-iron include Salas 7X daylights and Tady 45 ’s in blue and grey, spate and sardine colours. Good selections for yo-yo iron include Salas 6X and Salas 6X Jr. jigs in blue and lily-white, scrambled egg and off-color and chrome. The yellowtail observed along the coast have been quality sized fish with most up in the 15 -to-2 5-pound class.

Much of the San Diego County coastal net has been focused on sand bass, calico bass and sculpin with hard bottom and organize recognises developing most of the fish. The best place for sand bass has been fishing outside of and below the Imperial Beach Pier in 7 to 12 penetrates. Also productive has been such structures of the Imperial Beach Pipeline and hard sole areas outside of the Pipeline. Going further north, other productive halibut places have been the hard tush to the northwest of Buoy# 3 at Point Loma, the Jetty Kelp outside of Mission Bay, the upper result of La Jolla, the Anderson and Buccaneer Pipelines, the artificial reefs outside of Oceanside Harbor and Box Canyon.

There have been a few halibut chewing in areas up and down the San Diego County coast. Try sandy bottom beach and bay areas and recognizes where you can fish sandy bottom next to structure or can fish sandy underside contiguou to hard bottom.

Bob Vanian is the voice, novelist and researcher of the San Diego-based internet fish report service announced 976 -Bite which can be found at www. 976 bite.com. Vanian also provides anglers with a personal fish report service over the telephone at( 619) 226 -8 218. He ever welcomes your fish reports at that same phone number or at bob9 76 gnaw @aol. com.

https://www.fishrapnews.com/fishreports/wintertime-fishing-remains-good/

Safe Boating and Fishing Practices

January 13th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Safe Boating and Fishing Practices”

By Hayden Vega

Boating and fishing are some of the most popular highways that people experience their local waterways. Regrettably, hazardou dress like littering and dropping while on the irrigate can drastically slacken an ecosystem’s health. It is estimated that over 100 million marine swine will die this year due to pollution alone. Practicing safe boating and fishing dress can help mitigate the effects of pollution and help your waterways flourish for many years.

As a boater, one of the most common environmental impacts is chemical pollution. Common boat soaps and boat draws contain poisonous chemicals such as cuprous oxide, which is a known biocide. Cuprous oxide pollution can result in a deadly fog of chemicals that drifts through the liquid line, developing in die off of animals such as aquatic plants and native fish species. By scavenge your ship on shore and using products without cuprous oxide, you can help mitigate the loss of marine life and keep your waterway health. Too, another way to mitigate your chemical jolt is by getting your ship checked by the U.S. Coast Guard. The U.S. Coast Guard offers free craft inspections and educational directions to make sure that your boat congregates the necessary safety and environmental standards within your position. This includes checking for any fuel or chemical openings that may be present. By adopting healthy boating practises, you can protect the health of your waterway for many years to come.

Along with boating, harmful net practices can negatively impact your waterways. As of 2018, there is an estimated 79, 000 metric tons of plastic in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, with 46% being consisting of representatives of jettisoned fishing nets alone. One of the prime criminals of fishing contamination is discarded fishing line. A good tip-off for your next fishing trip is to take a reusable bag and use it as your designated line crate while you are out. The most common fishing line pollution is small bits of tag line that are trimmed from fishing bows. It may not seem like a lot, but those small-scale slice can add up by the end of the day. In addition, a health habit is to recycle your unsolicited angling string. Countless bodies of water have fishing line recycling receptacles available for you. If none extended to you, you can still recycle by send your angling order to a nearby net wrinkle recycling seed. Last time alone, the Boat U.S. Foundation’s Reel In andRecycle Program collected fairly fishing orders from their recycling receptacles to stretch from Washington D.C. to San Diego, CA. By practicing healthful net dress, you can help minimize your contribution to global pollution.

It’s important to understand that what we do on the spray has impacts on not only the environment but likewise the people around us. By practicing safer boating and fishing habits, we can minimize our impacts on the environment and ensure the longevity of the national resources we enjoy.

The post Safe Boating and Fishing Practices appeared first on Orange County Coastkeeper.

https://www.coastkeeper.org/safe-boating-and-fishing-practices/

With the Election Behind Us, the Fight for Clean Water Continues

January 12th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “With the Election Behind Us, the Fight for Clean Water Continues”

During each referendum season, we all get the opportunity to rise up and move our values heard on the issues that matter most to us. Polls demonstrate us the opportunity to support initiatives that further protect our communities and natural resources, especially when we select elected officials we trust to look out for our best interests.

While the votes are still being counted in federal elections, we are inspired by regional voter participation and local election results.

In Orange County alone, we witnessed a 77% voter turnout, with over 1.3 million votes cast in this election, according to the Orange County Registrar of Voters. Seeing that our community cares about and is involved in regional publications is reassuring to our democracy.

But we too received things locally that give us pause.

For example, special interest groups, like Poseidon, tried to undermine our democratic process. Poseidon is determined to introduced its friends on our local liquid cards by spending 50% more coin in the election than what was raised by all 18 countywide spray card nominees blended. According to the Orange County Register, Poseidon invested a whopping $419,000 in the past two months in those races in an attempt to gain majority control of the boards.

We’re happy to see the amount of money they contributed did not seem to sway voters. Voters did their own research and chose the most qualified candidates that best represented the priorities of the community.

While Poseidon’s two favored nominees in the Orange County Water District, Tri Ta of Division 4 and Cathy Green of Division 6, managed to clench a succes , not all Poseidon cronies earned a seat on our local irrigate boards.

In the Municipal Water District of Orange County( MWDOC ), Poseidon’s financially supported nominees- Tyler Diep, Debbie Neev and Stacy Lynne Taylor- all lost their hastens by a large margin in Division 3, Division 7 and Division 4, respectively. Poseidon’s heavy investment in this election is remarkable, as in the past 22 years they contributed less than $6,000 to MWDOC council candidates.

Poseidon is hungry for self-restraint of our regional water boards so that it can obtain a guaranteed purchase of all the water they grow at a price three times higher than other water, and to acquire approval of a $400 million subsidy. We have faith that members of our community will continue to help us protect our local coastal waters and marine habitats. Coastkeeper remains committed to fighting against this harmful, redundant, and outrageously costly desalination weed. Ratepayers, who are already fastened, cannot render to and should not have to pay to subsidize a affluent international corporation.

We must contend now to protect our coastal waters and marine habitats so benefit of future generations are able to enjoy California’s most precious resource: our coast.

Here’s how you can join us in our fight for safe, accessible and healthy water resources for all 😛 TAGEND

Subscribe to our newsletter and follow us on social media to stay up-to-date on our battle against Poseidon and other advocacy fights for cleanse liquid Become a representative or donate to help us amplify the articulations and the needs and requirements of local communities

The post With the Election Behind Us, the Fight for Clean Water Continues performed first on Orange County Coastkeeper.

https://www.coastkeeper.org/election2020/

Kayak Fishing the KING SALMON Spawn (NIGHTMARE TRIP!!) – Part 2 | Field Trips Wisconsin

January 5th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Kayak Fishing the KING SALMON Spawn (NIGHTMARE TRIP!!) – Part 2 | Field Trips Wisconsin”


WATCH PART 1 FIRST: https :// youtu.be/ o4YtsjQf6xs
In this incident I’m heading back into Sturgeon Bay for my second assault at sovereign salmon, this time in my kayak. Come along as I try new methods and brand-new areas in an attempt to FINALLY land my first tycoon( chinook) salmon.

Spoiler notify: it will NOT be easy. This one is an emotional roller coaster.

COMMENT BELOW and “ve been told” about a hallucination fishing trip of your own! What else could I have tried? Any gratuities?

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About Robert Field:

A few years back, I trenched the corporate grind to pursue my angers for traveling, fishing and the outdoor life-style. Now I live in a hasten trailer full hour, fishing and exploring my lane through all 50 states and around the world.

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