Posts tagged "blog"

Start a Meaningful Business as an Ecopreneur

September 27th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Start a Meaningful Business as an Ecopreneur”

By Carolyn Hart

Ecopreneurs are on the rise. Many new, environmentally conscious entrepreneurs are entering the business landscape, while a slew of well-established companies are turning their focus to the environment and greening their operations.

This is good news, but there’s much more to be done. If you have a passion for planet earth and want to use your business skills for meaningful causes, then becoming an ecopreneur might be just the right thing. And Coastkeeper has listed some tips and resources to help you get started on your journey:

Ecopreneur vs. Entrepreneur

As the term suggests, being an ecopreneur is similar to being an entrepreneur in many aspects. But a strong passion for the environment and a few other characteristics set ecopreneurs apart:

Ecopreneurs channel their love for the earth through determination to use global issues as opportunities to heal and restore. 
They prioritize collaboration and cooperation over competition, which is why innovative partnerships are so common among ecopreneurs. 
They look at every aspect of their operations to determine how they can better meet the needs of the environment and the community
And they never stop striving for innovative ways to solve problems, ultimately filling their work with meaning and purpose. 

First Steps

As with any type of business, you’ll need to lay a solid foundation before getting your venture off the ground. 

Consider your interests and skills, and research green business ideas. 
Settle on a viable business idea, come up with a business name, and make a business plan. 
Create a business budget and seek funding (e.g., grants, loans, investments, etc.).
Choose a business structure, and hire a formation service to set it up in California

Getting Ready to Launch

Once you’ve taken care of some of the groundwork, you’ll be in a good spot to put together your brand and market your business!

Develop your branding (e.g., logo, colors, fonts, etc.), and create a professional website.
Start promoting your brand through social media, email, and local sources.
Consider getting business insurance to protect your financial and intellectual investments. 
Obtain a green business certification from a reputable institution. 

There can be so much more to business than making money. While your green business must be profitable to withstand the challenges ahead, focusing on the environment at every turn will allow you to keep meaning and purpose at the center of your operations. If you feel the nudge to become an ecopreneur, now could be the time to make the leap! 

 

Click here to learn how you can get involved in protecting the State of Your Water.

if(!gform){document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,function(){gform.scriptsLoaded=!0}),window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,function(){gform.domLoaded=!0});var gform={domLoaded:!1,scriptsLoaded:!1,initializeOnLoaded:function(o){gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?o():!gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,o):document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,o)},hooks:{action:{},filter:{}},addAction:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“action”,o,n,r,t)},addFilter:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“filter”,o,n,r,t)},doAction:function(o){gform.doHook(“action”,o,arguments)},applyFilters:function(o){return gform.doHook(“filter”,o,arguments)},removeAction:function(o,n){gform.removeHook(“action”,o,n)},removeFilter:function(o,n,r){gform.removeHook(“filter”,o,n,r)},addHook:function(o,n,r,t,i){null==gform.hooks[o][n]&&(gform.hooks[o][n]=[]);var e=gform.hooks[o][n];null==i&&(i=n+”_”+e.length),null==t&&(t=10),gform.hooks[o][n].push({tag:i,callable:r,priority:t})},doHook:function(o,n,r){if(r=Array.prototype.slice.call(r,1),null!=gform.hooks[o][n]){var t,i=gform.hooks[o][n];i.sort(function(o,n){return o.priority-n.priority});for(var e=0;e

https://www.coastkeeper.org/start-a-meaningful-business-as-an-ecopreneur/

Celebrating World Rivers Day

September 25th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Celebrating World Rivers Day”

“Rivers are the arteries of our planet; they are lifelines in the truest sense.”

– Mark Angelo

 

On the fourth Sunday of September, which this year falls on September 26, millions of people in over 100 countries celebrate World Rivers Day. It is a celebration of the world’s waterways, highlighting the many values of rivers and striving to increase public awareness and encourage improved stewardship of them globally.

In 2005 the United Nations launched the Water for Life Decade to help create a greater awareness of the need to better care for our water resources. Following this, World Rivers Day was created by internationally renowned river advocate Mark Angelo. In 1980 he founded British Columbia Rivers Day and later on expanded it to World Rivers Day (WRD).

Angelo was motivated by rivers in virtually every country facing an array of threats, and decided that only through active involvement could he ensure their health in the years ahead.

River enthusiasts from around the world came together to organize the inaugural World Rivers Day event. That first event in 2005 was a great success, and was celebrated across dozens of countries. Since then, the event has continued to grow.

Orange County residents can join the celebration by supporting the Santa Ana River (SAR) Mouth report – a review of activities and threats to the Santa Ana River Mouth, which is governed by multiple municipalities. They can also team up with Orange County Coastkeeper for events ranging from stream cleanups and fish enhancement projects, to educational outings and community riverside celebrations.

Rivers are a precious resource in our region and all over the world. The state of your rivers depends on all of us.

Click here to learn how you can get involved in protecting the State of Your Water.

if(!gform){document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,function(){gform.scriptsLoaded=!0}),window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,function(){gform.domLoaded=!0});var gform={domLoaded:!1,scriptsLoaded:!1,initializeOnLoaded:function(o){gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?o():!gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,o):document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,o)},hooks:{action:{},filter:{}},addAction:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“action”,o,n,r,t)},addFilter:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“filter”,o,n,r,t)},doAction:function(o){gform.doHook(“action”,o,arguments)},applyFilters:function(o){return gform.doHook(“filter”,o,arguments)},removeAction:function(o,n){gform.removeHook(“action”,o,n)},removeFilter:function(o,n,r){gform.removeHook(“filter”,o,n,r)},addHook:function(o,n,r,t,i){null==gform.hooks[o][n]&&(gform.hooks[o][n]=[]);var e=gform.hooks[o][n];null==i&&(i=n+”_”+e.length),null==t&&(t=10),gform.hooks[o][n].push({tag:i,callable:r,priority:t})},doHook:function(o,n,r){if(r=Array.prototype.slice.call(r,1),null!=gform.hooks[o][n]){var t,i=gform.hooks[o][n];i.sort(function(o,n){return o.priority-n.priority});for(var e=0;e

https://www.coastkeeper.org/celebrating-world-rivers-day/

How I Helped Protect Native Species at the Santa Ana River Mouth

September 10th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “How I Helped Protect Native Species at the Santa Ana River Mouth”

By Sean Taylor

Hi! I am Sean, a junior at University of Southern California in the environmental studies program minoring in marine biology. During the spring 2021 semester I worked with Orange County Coastkeeper as a research and advocacy intern.

One of the first projects I got involved in was the Santa Ana River Mouth Project. The project aims to reduce the frequency of off-leash dogs in regulated areas which are mostly unenforced. These regulations have been put in place to protect threatened western snowy plover and California least tern nesting grounds, which off-leash dogs disrupt without most owners knowing about it.

After spending time researching the local regulations and investigating the best ways to publicly communicate environmental messages, I used my knowledge to create educational and volunteer recruitment flyers.

This led to the creation of various iterations in order to get the most effective messaging across and to provide accurate information. I quickly realized the importance of word choice to effectively communicate our message and to keep readers engaged.

These flyers represented my first experience of what it’s like to contribute to a professional environment outside of the classroom.

 

I have thoroughly appreciated my time as an intern at Coastkeeper and especially enjoyed any chance I got to design flyers or handouts! My fellow interns were amazing and my supervisor, Ray Hiemstra, created a virtual environment that promoted collaboration between us.

The variety of projects has helped develop a multitude of different professional skills and has provided insight to the many avenues used to promote the protection of water resources. I’m sad to leave Coastkeeper, but know that I can always come to the beach cleanups and help out with the MPA watches even after my internship!

 

 

Click here to learn how you can get involved in protecting the State of Your Water.

if(!gform){document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,function(){gform.scriptsLoaded=!0}),window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,function(){gform.domLoaded=!0});var gform={domLoaded:!1,scriptsLoaded:!1,initializeOnLoaded:function(o){gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?o():!gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,o):document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,o)},hooks:{action:{},filter:{}},addAction:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“action”,o,n,r,t)},addFilter:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“filter”,o,n,r,t)},doAction:function(o){gform.doHook(“action”,o,arguments)},applyFilters:function(o){return gform.doHook(“filter”,o,arguments)},removeAction:function(o,n){gform.removeHook(“action”,o,n)},removeFilter:function(o,n,r){gform.removeHook(“filter”,o,n,r)},addHook:function(o,n,r,t,i){null==gform.hooks[o][n]&&(gform.hooks[o][n]=[]);var e=gform.hooks[o][n];null==i&&(i=n+”_”+e.length),null==t&&(t=10),gform.hooks[o][n].push({tag:i,callable:r,priority:t})},doHook:function(o,n,r){if(r=Array.prototype.slice.call(r,1),null!=gform.hooks[o][n]){var t,i=gform.hooks[o][n];i.sort(function(o,n){return o.priority-n.priority});for(var e=0;e

https://www.coastkeeper.org/how-i-helped-protect-native-species-at-the-santa-ana-river-mouth/

Defending Water Quality from Coastline to Courtroom

August 30th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Defending Water Quality from Coastline to Courtroom”

With August and National Water Quality month in the rearview, it’s a good time to look back at Orange County Coastkeeper’s history and how it impacts the water conservation work we do today. 

First, let’s remember that our goal is to help Southern Californians access fishable, swimmable and drinkable water. 

A Look Back in Time 

Let’s flash back to 1972. Southern Californians were wearing bell-bottoms and riding longboards along our coasts. And much like today, they loved the water. Unfortunately that water, in terms of cleanliness, was not good.  All around the country, decades of pollution and a lack of regulation created major water quality issues. Around this time, two thirds of the nation’s lakes, rivers, and coastal waters were deemed unsafe for fishing or swimming. There were even infamous instances like Ohio’s Cuyahoga River catching on fire in 1969 and also that year, an oil spill in San Bernardino.  

Because of this, Congress established the Clean Water Act in 1972 to protect water quality by a bipartisan super majority after it was vetoed by Nixon. The Clean Water Act’s objective was – and still is – to restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation’s waters. The Clean Water Act provides a basic structure for regulating 1) discharges of pollutants into the waters of the United States, mainly, via permits, and 2) water quality standards for surface waters.  

Protecting the State of Your Water

By the time Coastkeeper came along in the 1990s, we recognized water quality standards and Clean Water Act permit terms were crucial, yet lacked enforcement. In response, we created Coastkeeper’s water quality enforcement program, where we work to ensure the standards set by the Clean Water Act are upheld in our watershed.

To accomplish this, our teams go out into the field to identify local water quality violations and then we use one of the most effective and efficient tools we have as water warriors – litigation.

That may sound fancy, but the goal is simply to make things better for the environment and for the average person – for all of us to enjoy clean water. Sadly, too many people mistreat our region’s bodies of water and fail to meet their obligations under the Clean Water Act, which is when we activate our enforcement program. 

Think of it this way. The enforcement program has YOU in mind. Through enforcement, we can directly defend water quality standards. Procedures range from investigating community pollution reports to collecting water samples for laboratory testing to, if and when necessary, submitting a 60-day notice of violation letter initiating a Clean Water Act citizen enforcement suit. 

There are various enforcement mechanisms by which a citizen suit functions:

staff members of our legal team researching and filing a complaint
staff members conducting site inspections and analyzing discovery materials
staff members working with defendants to reach a resolution
staff members following up with defendants post-resolution to ensure they are addressing their pollution problems and on track to come into compliance with the Clean Water Act 

At the same time, our team also writes comment letters in connection with proposed governmental agency actions, participates in stakeholder engagement meetings on all things water quality, drafts and reviews responses to Public Record Act request letters to various California municipalities and counties, Regional Water Boards, the California State Water Board, and CalEPA, and more.

We do all of this to ensure that the state’s natural water resources – YOUR natural water resources – are clean and safe for the public and for wildlife.

Ultimately, our enforcement goals revolve around our mission: to protect our region’s water resources so they are swimmable, drinkable and fishable for all now and into the future.

Finders, Keepers

Litigation may be a scary term to some and we would certainly prefer to have perfectly clean waters with no violations to enforce. But the ultimate goal is increased water quality and we are here to protect. 

Today, Orange County Coastkeeper is one of more than 300 Waterkeeper Alliance programs throughout the world. Every region is different, and each program ensures the needs of their water resources are met and protected efficiently.

Enforcement agencies consider citizen suits the primary responsible party for enforcement, and a large number of our waterways are still legally impaired.

We are especially proud of the work we do here and invite you to join us. Come be a part of Coastal Cleanup Day as a way to get involved to protect water quality in the region. You can also continue to learn through our State of Your Water updates and consider contributing a donation.

Our water depends on it.

Click here to learn how you can get involved in protecting the State of Your Water.

if(!gform){document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,function(){gform.scriptsLoaded=!0}),window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,function(){gform.domLoaded=!0});var gform={domLoaded:!1,scriptsLoaded:!1,initializeOnLoaded:function(o){gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?o():!gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,o):document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,o)},hooks:{action:{},filter:{}},addAction:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“action”,o,n,r,t)},addFilter:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“filter”,o,n,r,t)},doAction:function(o){gform.doHook(“action”,o,arguments)},applyFilters:function(o){return gform.doHook(“filter”,o,arguments)},removeAction:function(o,n){gform.removeHook(“action”,o,n)},removeFilter:function(o,n,r){gform.removeHook(“filter”,o,n,r)},addHook:function(o,n,r,t,i){null==gform.hooks[o][n]&&(gform.hooks[o][n]=[]);var e=gform.hooks[o][n];null==i&&(i=n+”_”+e.length),null==t&&(t=10),gform.hooks[o][n].push({tag:i,callable:r,priority:t})},doHook:function(o,n,r){if(r=Array.prototype.slice.call(r,1),null!=gform.hooks[o][n]){var t,i=gform.hooks[o][n];i.sort(function(o,n){return o.priority-n.priority});for(var e=0;e

https://www.coastkeeper.org/defending-water-quality-from-coastline-to-courtroom/

Dive Into Your Water: Ways to Get Involved to Keep Local Beaches Clean

July 16th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Dive Into Your Water: Ways to Get Involved to Keep Local Beaches Clean”

As outdoor activities ramp up this summer, the region’s beaches will begin to fill up with enthusiastic beachgoers that want to enjoy the fresh ambience California has to offer. But before you hit the waves, take a moment to look around you and see the human impact of trash on our beaches. If you’re looking for activities or ways to contribute to your community, there are many ways you can get involved to help keep our beaches clean and healthy.

With the easing of pandemic restrictions, we’re bringing back our community and corporate cleanups in Orange County. If you’d like to keep our beaches clean at your own time, you can also take a walk around your local beach or neighborhood and clean any litter or trash you find. Remember: the beach begins at your back door with your local watershed.

Every effort counts, and while not all of us can participate in public cleanup events, we can all make an impact on the health of our oceans and beaches. Here are some tips on how you can make an impact in keeping California’s coast and beaches pristine.

Be safe during a beach cleanup:
Before heading to your local beach and cleaning up trash, safety should be first above all. Be sure to be prepared with gloves, sturdy bags, sunglasses and reef-safe sunscreen, or even a grabber tool if you have one at hand. If you find hazardous or sharp items, alert a lifeguard so they can help safely dispose of the objects.

Be conscious of the plastic you’re taking on your trip to your local beach:
It’s important to clean up after ourselves, and it’s essential to be mindful of the waste we’re contributing to our environment. According to a National Geographic article, around 8 million tons of plastic get into our oceans every year. An easy way to start is by switching from a single use plastic bottle to a reusable water bottle. You can even take the “Plastic Free July” challenge and try to eliminate single use plastics from your next beach trip entirely! Choosing to use reusable utensils, compostable food packaging, and reusing plastic food containers is a great place to start!

Donate to a cleanup program:
Donating to a local nonprofit organization, like Orange County Coastkeeper, that works to keep our waterways clean is a great way to help in your own community if you’re not able to get out directly. Donations that are received for Coastkeeper’s Cleanup OC program go to providing cleanup supplies and supporting event staff that are devoted to protecting our local beaches.

 

In 2020, our OC cleanup socially-distance events gathered 575 volunteers and removed 1,189 pounds of trash. To make sure our beaches are even cleaner and healthier, Coastkeeper wants #WaterWarriors like yourself help protect and restore the environment we call home. Grab your reef-safe sunscreen, reusable water bottle and reusable bag, and get to the beach!

Click here to learn how you can get involved in protecting the State of Your Water.

if(!gform){document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,function(){gform.scriptsLoaded=!0}),window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,function(){gform.domLoaded=!0});var gform={domLoaded:!1,scriptsLoaded:!1,initializeOnLoaded:function(o){gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?o():!gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,o):document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,o)},hooks:{action:{},filter:{}},addAction:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“action”,o,n,r,t)},addFilter:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“filter”,o,n,r,t)},doAction:function(o){gform.doHook(“action”,o,arguments)},applyFilters:function(o){return gform.doHook(“filter”,o,arguments)},removeAction:function(o,n){gform.removeHook(“action”,o,n)},removeFilter:function(o,n,r){gform.removeHook(“filter”,o,n,r)},addHook:function(o,n,r,t,i){null==gform.hooks[o][n]&&(gform.hooks[o][n]=[]);var e=gform.hooks[o][n];null==i&&(i=n+”_”+e.length),null==t&&(t=10),gform.hooks[o][n].push({tag:i,callable:r,priority:t})},doHook:function(o,n,r){if(r=Array.prototype.slice.call(r,1),null!=gform.hooks[o][n]){var t,i=gform.hooks[o][n];i.sort(function(o,n){return o.priority-n.priority});for(var e=0;e

https://www.coastkeeper.org/ways-to-get-involved-to-keep-local-beaches-clean/

Transitioning to an Environmentally Friendly Diet

June 16th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Transitioning to an Environmentally Friendly Diet”

By Ely Khatib

My name is Ely and I have been vegan for a little over a year now. I didn’t do it for my health or to get more fit, although that is a good added benefit to the lifestyle. I changed my diet for two reasons: for the animals and for the environment.

Animals are excessively abused by farmers and are not taken care of, nor killed, in a humane way. Many are crammed into small places, fed corn meal, and beaten with a blunt object to kill them. Animal products also use the most water and land, and produce more greenhouse gases than any plant-based foods, fruits and vegetables.

It’s not necessary for everyone to go fully vegan to help curb animal abuse and improve the environment. I am not going to try to make you stop eating meat entirely. What really matters is that each person minimizes their intake, so that the agricultural industry isn’t so overwhelmed by consumers. This will help prevent the industry from cramming animals in tight spaces and using excess resources that lead to environmental consequences.

So, what does this mean for your diet? This could be as simple as reducing your meat and dairy consumption from three times a day to once a day, or from every day to three times a week.

I know people who only eat animal products when they go out to eat, but never when they cook at home. Or people who only eat animal products on the weekends. Even eating solely chicken and turkey instead of red meat – which uses the most land, energy, water, and produces the most greenhouse gases – is better than no change at all.

Regardless of which changes you adopt; the whole idea is to do what you can to minimize your impact on the environment and reduce the need for the animal agriculture industry to abuse animals.

People may think being vegan is hard, but when you practice it, it’s actually super easy, especially when you eat at home. Most people avoid veganism for a multitude of reasons, such as fear of hormone changes (estrogen), malnourishment, or just because meat tastes so good.

The truth is that hormone imbalances do not come from consuming soy milk instead of real milk, or from avoiding meat. Your body does not produce more testosterone because you eat meat, nor does it produce more estrogen because you don’t.

Avoiding malnourishment just takes care and attention. For example, because I do not eat red meat I lack iron and vitamin B-12. To combat this, I take supplements, eat a lot of spinach, eat certain cereals, and drink lots of non-dairy milk.

Another argument is that vegans do not get enough protein, but I can assure you that I eat more than enough nuts, vegan protein powders, enough protein bars, and drink enough soy milk to meet my needs as an athlete.

Furthermore, there are also many new plant-based “meats” that serve as my supplement for meat when I make tacos, pastas, burgers, and burritos at home. They are even vegan corn dogs and “chicken” nuggets at the store – for when I want a late-night snack.

Finally, when transitioning to a vegan lifestyle (or a vegetarian / low-meat one), it can be very hard to make the jump cold turkey. One technique is to slowly reduce your intake over the course of six months. Start by eating meat three days instead of five, then go down to once after three weeks, then to none after another three weeks.

Try the techniques above, such as only eating meat when you go out with friends or only on weekends. Whatever you can do makes a difference, and if you do it right, the transition can be easy and comfortable.

Modifying your diet will help the environment in the long run, and it’s only one of the many ways to get involved in protecting our precious water and natural resources.

An added bonus is that you may become the best cook of your friend group and everyone will be impressed with how healthy you are. Good luck!

Click here to learn how you can get involved in protecting the State of Your Water.

if(!gform){document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,function(){gform.scriptsLoaded=!0}),window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,function(){gform.domLoaded=!0});var gform={domLoaded:!1,scriptsLoaded:!1,initializeOnLoaded:function(o){gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?o():!gform.domLoaded&&gform.scriptsLoaded?window.addEventListener(“DOMContentLoaded”,o):document.addEventListener(“gform_main_scripts_loaded”,o)},hooks:{action:{},filter:{}},addAction:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“action”,o,n,r,t)},addFilter:function(o,n,r,t){gform.addHook(“filter”,o,n,r,t)},doAction:function(o){gform.doHook(“action”,o,arguments)},applyFilters:function(o){return gform.doHook(“filter”,o,arguments)},removeAction:function(o,n){gform.removeHook(“action”,o,n)},removeFilter:function(o,n,r){gform.removeHook(“filter”,o,n,r)},addHook:function(o,n,r,t,i){null==gform.hooks[o][n]&&(gform.hooks[o][n]=[]);var e=gform.hooks[o][n];null==i&&(i=n+”_”+e.length),null==t&&(t=10),gform.hooks[o][n].push({tag:i,callable:r,priority:t})},doHook:function(o,n,r){if(r=Array.prototype.slice.call(r,1),null!=gform.hooks[o][n]){var t,i=gform.hooks[o][n];i.sort(function(o,n){return o.priority-n.priority});for(var e=0;e

https://www.coastkeeper.org/transitioning-to-an-environmentally-friendly-diet/

How I Helped the Forest Service Develop a Water Monitoring Program

June 8th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “How I Helped the Forest Service Develop a Water Monitoring Program”

By Rachel

While working as an intern at Orange County Coastkeeper, I had the opportunity to assist the Forest Service in the development of a Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for a water quality monitoring program in the Cleveland National Forest. A QAPP is a document that outlines the procedures for a monitoring project in order to ensure the data it collects and analyzes will meet the project requirements.

The QAPP I helped develop describes the procedures for collecting samples of indicator bacteria (E. Coli and Enterococcus) at three different field sites within the Cleveland National Forest.

In order to choose which sites and contaminants to monitor, some other interns and I researched which impaired bodies of water in the region also fell within the boundaries of the Cleveland National Forest by examining the map on the 303(d) list from the State Water Resources Control Board website.

Under Clean Water Act (CWA) section 303(d), states are required by the United States Environmental Protection Agency to submit a list of waters within its boundaries not meeting water quality standards (impaired waters) as well as the water quality parameter (i.e., pollutant) not being met. This list is referred to as the 303(d) list.

After compiling a list of impaired bodies of water within Cleveland National Forest, we then looked into which specific contaminants were listed and where these samples were collected.

Using the latitude and longitude data of these monitoring sites from the State Water Resources Control Board site, we were then able to confirm whether these specific samples were collected within the forest boundaries and identified three potential bodies of water to monitor for indicator bacteria: Trabuco Creek, Silverado Creek, and San Juan Creek.

The next step was to collect water samples from each site and send them to the lab to be analyzed for levels of E. Coli and Enterococcus.

I was able to conduct sampling at one of the sites (Silverado Creek) with another Coastkeeper intern. The procedure was very similar to the sampling procedures for stormwater monitoring. Because there was a good amount of water flowing in the creek, we were able to use the sampling bottles to collect water samples directly from the creek.

After collecting our samples and filling out the field data sheets for each one, we then dropped off our samples back at the Coastkeeper office so they could be taken to the lab later that day to be analyzed for indicator bacteria levels along with the samples from the other sites.

Below is a photo of my fellow intern from when we went sampling at Silverado Creek!

Click here to learn how you can get involved in protecting the State of Your Water.

Coastkeeper Newsletter Signup

Name*

First

Last

Email*

Mobile Phone*Subscription Type*

Send me email updates

Send me text message updates
CommentsThis field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

 

 

The State of Your Water is in our hands. Support us today so that we may continue to advocate for
water conservation and keep our coastal and inland waters clean.

Donate Today

The post How I Helped the Forest Service Develop a Water Monitoring Program appeared first on Orange County Coastkeeper.

https://www.coastkeeper.org/how-i-helped-the-forest-service-develop-a-water-monitoring-program/

What I Learned About Stormwater Monitoring

June 7th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “What I Learned About Stormwater Monitoring”

By Rachel

During my internship with Orange County Coastkeeper, I had the opportunity to learn about stormwater monitoring in order to monitor water quality in public areas adjacent to industrial sites throughout Orange County. My group and I collected samples in order to help Coastkeeper in its efforts to ensure compliance with the Clean Water Act (CWA) and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) requirements following rainfall events.

The stormwater monitoring training included going over sampling procedures, how to fill out field data sheets for each site, what to look for at field sites, and how to use any equipment such as a sampling pole, Whirl-Pak bags, and sampling bottles.

During my stormwater monitoring experience, we collected samples for indicator bacteria and sevral types of metals at multiple industrial sites in Orange County, including an asphalt plant, a powder core manufacturing facility, and an aerospace manufacturing facility.

Industrial sites are areas that are designated specifically for industrial use (such as manufacturing facilities, factories, and warehouses), which are often a large source of contamination to the air and water in our communities.

Pollutants from industrial sites impact water resources through runoff, which is water that is not absorbed by the ground and instead flows freely while picking up pollutants from roads, roofs, and other surfaces. Industrial runoff originates directly from industrial sites and commonly includes substances such as oil, grease, hazardous chemicals, and sediment such as dirt, gravel, or cement.

Runoff from rainfall events enters storm drains and ultimately ends up in Orange County’s oceans, rivers, and creeks. Since this water is not treated before this happens, it can contaminate water resources, negatively impact water ecosystems, and result in beach closures due to elevated levels of chemicals or bacteria. Because of this, industrial sites require monitoring and must adhere to environmental regulations in order to reduce negative environmental impacts.

When choosing sites to conduct water quality monitoring, it is important to consider several factors. First, there should be safe and unrestricted access at the site. The water sample should also be representative of the water body of interest. It is also important to select sites that have a history of water pollution or contamination. Often, the sites that Coastkeeper monitors are chosen either because they have previously self-submitted data showing pollution and environmental regulatory agencies have taken no action, or because of a direct site observation or tip from someone.

After all water samples are collected and field data sheets are filled out, they are dropped off at Coastkeeper’s office where they are then taken to the lab to be analyzed. The samples and resulting water quality data can be used for litigation, which can lead to more scrutiny of industrial sites or even enforcement actions to ensure compliance with industrial permits.

Stormwater monitoring is essential in ensuring drinkable, fishable, and swimmable water in our community. Check out how Coastkeeper helps prevent stormwater pollution and learn about getting involved in protecting the State of Your Water.

Coastkeeper Newsletter Signup

Name*

First

Last

Email*

Mobile Phone*Subscription Type*

Send me email updates

Send me text message updates
CommentsThis field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

 

 

The State of Your Water is in our hands. Support us today so that we may continue to advocate for
water conservation and keep our coastal and inland waters clean.

Donate Today

The post What I Learned About Stormwater Monitoring appeared first on Orange County Coastkeeper.

https://www.coastkeeper.org/what-i-learned-about-stormwater-monitoring/

Skip the Plastic Straw’s Story & Campaign

June 5th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Skip the Plastic Straw’s Story & Campaign”

Hi! My name is Chloe Mei Espinosa. I am 14 years old and the founder of Skip the Plastic Straw. I started my campaign when I was 11 years old for a sixth-grade school project, called the Passion Project, where I was able to research anything I was passionate about.

As a scuba diver, I love the ocean and marine mammals. I was very heartbroken after watching the video of a plastic straw stuck in a turtle’s nose. It was a wake-up call to me and I knew I had to take action to protect these innocent marine animals from plastic pollution.

For my Passion Project, I chose to research and campaign against the use of single-use plastic straws. I created my website, SkipThePlasticStraw.com, and Instagram page, @skiptheplasticstraw, to educate people on the harmful effects of single-use plastic straws.

Americans use 500 million plastic straws every day, which could fill more than 46,400 large school buses. That’s a lot of straws! Unlike other plastics, plastic straws are not recyclable or biodegradable – you use a plastic straw for a few minutes but it outlives you and stays on the planet for hundreds of years. Plastic straws only break down into microscopic pieces and marine animals mistake them as food, causing them to injure, suffocate or die. If this doesn’t change, plastic will continue to end up in the ocean and affect marine life indefinitely. We all need to do our part to reduce our consumption of single-use plastic – and plastic straws are a good start!


Since my campaign launched in April 2018, I have convinced PALI Outdoor Science Institute in the San Bernardino Mountains, three school districts (128 schools in total), and two hospitals in Orange County to join my campaign to remove all plastic straws from their cafeterias.

I created posters to display at all 128 schools to inform students and teachers of the new change and to hopefully inspire them to skip the plastic straw even outside of school. I also started a lecture series to youth groups and adults and have presented to thousands of people on the harmful effects of single-use plastic straws.

I received the Captain Planet Foundation’s Young Superhero for Earth Award in 2018, Top 100 Influencers in 2018 in Orange County by The Orange County Register, the Junior Philanthropist Award in 2019 from Pacific Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach, and Ocean Hero Award in 2019 from OCEANA in recognition of my work.


Last November, I was invited as a guest to share my campaign on The Kelly Clarkson Show and, just recently, I was honored to be selected as a Finalist for the TIME Magazine/Nickelodeon first-ever Kid of the Year 2020.

In 2019, I was given amazing opportunities to work on other environmental projects. I was also selected to be on the Delta Green Up Youth Advisory Board, working with other youth to help make Delta Air Lines a more sustainable airline. And I was selected as a judge for the Redford Center Stories Film Competition, encouraging middle school children to get creative and produce short films on ways they can help beat plastic pollution.

Since I haven’t been able to do in-person presentations due to the pandemic, my sister (Ella Lin) and I decided to find other ways of reaching out to people, including launching a new YouTube Channel called the Sustainable Sisters! Our channel is all about reviewing eco-friendly products and brands, and sharing ways we can all help to protect our environment!


We also organized our first-ever Skip the Plastic Straw Global Cleanup Challenge with Litterati in the month of September with a goal to collect at least 10,000 pieces of trash. In just one month, we exceeded our goal and picked up – and documented – a total of 11,361 pieces of trash! We had a total of 76 amazing participants from all over the world – including the USA, Netherlands, Spain, Qatar, Philippines, Pakistan, Africa, and even Singapore – who joined our global virtual cleanup challenge. For more details on my work during COVID-19, read my website blog: skiptheplasticstraw.com/blog

Through this campaign, I’ve learned that it’s possible for one person – adult or kid – to make a difference for our environment. All it takes is someone who cares passionately enough to start their journey to low-waste living or even to begin a campaign.

Single-use plastic straws are a problem, but they’re only the tip of the single-use plastic problem. If you can start by joining me to skip that plastic straw and switch to alternative straws – like a glass, bamboo or a metal straws – or no straw at all, you will already be making a huge difference!

You can also help by printing or emailing my campaign restaurant flyer to your favorite restaurant and ask them to consider switching to a biodegradable option.

-Chloe Mei

“Skip the plastic straw. Save our oceans.”

The post Skip the Plastic Straw’s Story & Campaign appeared first on Orange County Coastkeeper.

https://www.coastkeeper.org/skip-the-plastic-straws-story-campaign/

Dishing Out Water Conservation Tips – How to Save Water in Your Kitchen

June 4th, 2021 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Dishing Out Water Conservation Tips – How to Save Water in Your Kitchen”

By Kathryn

Our first line of defense when it comes to water conservation can start in your own home!

Finding ways to save water and be more sustainable can have a big impact locally and for the planet. Although it may be an adjustment at first, a lot of the following recommendations may also save you money.

As the ongoing drought leaves us wary of summer and what is to come, there are also concerns about increasing water bills, which can have a huge impact on many families in Orange County. Ultimately, we want to save the planet and your wallet.

water-conservation-1

The State of Your Water is in our hands. Support us today so that we may continue to advocate for
water conservation and keep our coastal and inland waters pristine.

Donate Today

 

Here are some tips and tricks you can use to save water and practice sustainability while doing your dishes in the kitchen, in recognition of National No Dirty Dishes Day:

water-conservation-2When you are waiting for the water to get warm, have buckets or containers close by to collect the water. You can use this water to water your plants or top off your pet’s water bowl!
When trying to clean off those hard-to-wash stains, instead of running the water while trying to scrub, leave these dishes in the sink to soak for a bit.
One of the best ways that I have tried to get the glue off from a glass jar, if you are trying to reuse it, is to use a little olive oil and baking soda on it. Let it sit for 15 minutes and then scrub it off.
Try to lower the water pressure or turn of the water when you are scrubbing your dishes before rinsing them. This is something you can also do when you are washing your hands, brushing your teeth, or shampooing your hair.
You can also look at water-saving, higher-pressure sink nozzles to replace your old ones.
If you want to cut back on plastic waste, you can reuse a bottle (I like using my glass amber bottles with a pump) by refilling it with soap whenever you run out. My favorite refillable bull store is Eco Now (located in Costa Mesa and Anaheim) and they have many sustainable, non-toxic options for your entire home.
You can also opt for non-plastic cleaning scrubbers made from bamboo, for example, which when you are done with them can be composted or can be replaced with a new head.
Being conscious of what you pour down your sink is also very important. Using baking soda and vinegar to clean the inside of your sink when you are done with all your dishes is one way to avoid putting toxic solutions down your drain.

If you are able to integrate any of these tricks into your routine, you’ll be helping the planet and maybe even having fun doing the dishes (if that is even possible)!

Tag @occoastkeeper on Instagram with #NationalNoDirtyDishesDay to show us how you plan to prioritize sustainability in your kitchen. And check out the ways you can get involved in protecting the State of Your Water.

Select your region:*

Orange County

Inland Empire

Coachella Valley
Name* Email*

CommentsThis field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

The post Dishing Out Water Conservation Tips – How to Save Water in Your Kitchen appeared first on Orange County Coastkeeper.

https://www.coastkeeper.org/dishing-out-water-conservation-tips-how-to-save-water-in-your-kitchen/

Book Rentals